NEURAL CONNECTIVITY OF THE AMYGDALA IN THE HUMAN BRAIN: A DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING STUDY

Title
NEURAL CONNECTIVITY OF THE AMYGDALA IN THE HUMAN BRAIN: A DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING STUDY
Author(s)
장성호권혁규
Keywords
ANATOMICAL CONNECTIVITY; CORTICAL PROJECTIONS; PREFRONTAL CORTEX; MONKEY AMYGDALA; MACAQUE MONKEY; TRACTOGRAPHY; NUCLEUS; MOTOR; DYSFUNCTION; DEPRESSION
Issue Date
201412
Publisher
ACAD SCIENCES CZECH REPUBLIC, INST COMPUTER SCIENCE
Citation
NEURAL NETWORK WORLD, v.24, no.6, pp.591 - 599
Abstract
Several diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have reported on the anatomical neural tracts between the amygdala and specific brain regions. However, no study on the neural connectivity of the amygdala has been reported. In the current study, using probabilistic DTI tractography, we attempted to investigate the neural connectivity of the amygdala in normal subjects. Forty eight healthy subjects were recruited for this study. A seed region of interest was drawn at the amygdala using the FMRIB Software Library based on probabilistic DTI tractography. Connectivity was defined as the incidence of connection between the amygdala and each brain region at the threshold of 1 and 5 streamlines. The amygdala showed 100% connectivity to the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and medial temporal cortex regardless of the thresholds. In contrast, regarding the thresholds of 1 and 5 streamlines, the amygdala showed high conncetivity (over 60%) to the globus pallidus (100% and 92.7%), brainstem (83.3% and 78.1%), put amen (72.9% and 63.5%), occipito-temporal cortex (72.9% and 67.7%), orbitofrontal cortex (70.8 and 43.8%), caudate nucleus (63.5% and 45.8%), and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (63.5% and 31.3%), respectively. The amygdala showed high connectivity to the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, medial temporal cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem, occipito-temporal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. We believe that the methods and results of this study provide useful information to clinicians and researchers studying the amygdala.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/30347
ISSN
1210-0552
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 재활의학교실 > Articles
의과대학 > 영상의학과학교실 > Articles
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