Sex Differences in Management and Mortality of Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (from the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction National Registry)

Title
Sex Differences in Management and Mortality of Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (from the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction National Registry)
Author(s)
김영조강시혁[강시혁]서종원[서종원]윤창환[윤창환]조명찬[조명찬]채성철[채성철]윤정한[윤정한]권현철[권현철]한규록[한규록]김주한[김주한]안영근[안영근]정명호[정명호]김효수[김효수]최동주[최동주]
Keywords
PERCUTANEOUS CORONARY INTERVENTION; PRIMARY ANGIOPLASTY; HOSPITAL MORTALITY; PROPENSITY SCORE; WOMEN; MEN; OUTCOMES; DISEASE; DEATH
Issue Date
201203
Publisher
EXCERPTA MEDICA INC-ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC
Citation
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, v.109, no.6, pp.787 - 793
Abstract
There has been controversy over the disparity between men and women with regard to the management and prognosis of acute myocardial infarction. Analyzing nationwide multi-center prospective registries in Korea, the aim of this study was to determine whether female gender independently imposes a risk for mortality. Data from 14,253 patients who were hospitalized for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction from November 2005 to September 2010 were extracted from registries. Compared to men, women were older (mean age 56 +/- 12 vs 67 +/- 10 years, p < 0.001), and female gender was associated with a higher frequency of co-morbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Women had longer pain-to-door time and more severe hemodynamic status than men. All-cause mortality rates were 13.6% in women and 7.0% in men at 1 year after the index admission (hazard ratio for women 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.80 to 2.25, p < 0.001). The risk for death after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction corresponded highly with age. Although the risk remained high after adjusting for age, further analyses adjusting for medical history, clinical performance, and hemodynamic status diminished the gender effect (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.86 to 1.17, p = 0.821). Propensity score matching, as a sensitivity analysis, corroborated the results. In conclusion, this study shows that women have a comparable risk for death after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction as men. The gender effect was accounted for mostly by the women's older age, complex co-morbidities, and severe hemodynamic conditions at presentation. (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Inc. (Am J Cardiol 2012;109:787-793)
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/29546http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j,amjcard.2011.11.006
ISSN
0002-9149
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의과대학 > 내과학교실 > Articles
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