Functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor tractography of the corticopontocerebellar tract in the human brain

Title
Functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor tractography of the corticopontocerebellar tract in the human brain
Author(s)
장성호홍지헌
Keywords
ABERRANT PYRAMIDAL TRACT; RHESUS-MONKEY; MEDIAL LEMNISCUS; PONTOCEREBELLAR PROJECTION; CORTICOPONTINE PROJECTION; HORSERADISH-PEROXIDASE; CORTICOSPINAL TRACT; MOTOR CORTEX; STEM; ORGANIZATION
Issue Date
201101
Publisher
SHENYANG EDITORIAL DEPT NEURAL REGENERATION RES
Citation
NEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH, v.6, no.1, pp.76 - 80
Abstract
The anatomical organization of the corticopontocerebellar tract (CPCT) in the human brain remains poorly understood. The present study investigated probabilistic tractography of the CPCT in the human brain using diffusion tensor tractography with functional magnetic resonance imaging. CPCT data was obtained from 14 healthy subjects. CPCT images were obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor tractography, revealing that the CPCT originated from the primary sensorimotor cortex and descended to the pontine nucleus through the corona radiata, the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the cerebral peduncle. After crossing the pons through the transverse pontine fibers, the CPCT entered the cerebellum via the middle cerebral peduncle. However, some variation was detected in the midbrain (middle cerebral peduncle and/or medial lemniscus) and pons (ventral and/or dorsal transverse pontine fibers). The CPCT was analyzed in 3 dimensions from the cerebral cortex to the cerebellum. These results could be informative for future studies of motor control in the human brain.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/25760http://dx.doi.org/10.3969/j.issn.1673-5374.2011.01.013
ISSN
1673-5374
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 재활의학교실 > Articles
의과대학 > 영상의학과학교실 > Articles
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