The cortical effect of clapping in the human brain: A functional MRI study

Title
The cortical effect of clapping in the human brain: A functional MRI study
Author(s)
장성호김민지[김민지]홍지헌
Keywords
PRIMARY MOTOR CORTEX; CEREBRAL-CORTEX; ACTIVATION; STIMULATION; MOVEMENTS; EXERCISE; APPLAUSE; PATTERNS; TASKS; FMRI
Issue Date
201103
Publisher
IOS PRESS
Citation
NEUROREHABILITATION, v.28, no.2, pp.75 - 79
Abstract
Since development of functional MRI (fMRI), many studies have reported on cortical activation by external stimuli. However, there has been no fMRI study on the cortical effect of clapping. Using fMRI, we investigated the cortical activation effect of clapping in comparison with other motor tasks in the healthy human brain. Fourteen healthy volunteers were recruited. fMRI was performed using a 1.5-T Philips Gyroscan Intera with a standard head coil. Clapping, grasp-release movements, and sequential finger opposition of both hands were performed. Regions of interest (ROIs) were set at the primary sensori-motor cortex (SM1), supplementary motor cortex (SMA), and premotor cortex (PMC). The activated voxel number of all ROIs was in the following order: clapping, sequential opposition, and grasp-release movements. In the SM1, clapping showed the most significant activation, followed by sequential opposition, and grasp-release movements. By contrast, the PMC was most activated by sequential opposition, and then clapping and grasp-release movements, in order. As for the SMA, clapping evoked the most significant activation, followed by clapping, and grasp-release movements. We found that clapping showed the most significant cortical activation in ROIs among three motor tasks. Clapping appears to be an effective method for stimulation of the brain.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/25571http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-2011-0634
ISSN
1053-8135
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 재활의학교실 > Articles
의과대학 > 영상의학과학교실 > Articles
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