Trichoderma Species as Abiotic and Biotic Stress Quenchers in Plants

Title
Trichoderma Species as Abiotic and Biotic Stress Quenchers in Plants
Author(s)
배한홍
Keywords
BIOLOGICAL-CONTROL; SECONDARY METABOLITES; THEOBROMA-CACAO; AMBIENT-PH; IN-VIVO; HARZIANUM; BIOCONTROL; FUNGAL; DROUGHT; SOIL
Issue Date
201108
Publisher
RESEARCH JOURNAL BIOTECHNOLOGY
Citation
RESEARCH JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY, v.6, no.3, pp.73 - 79
Abstract
Trichoderma species have recently been described as opportunistic, avirulent plant symbionts with potential to control plant diseases. Trichoderma species are soil fungi that have been studied extensively for their biological control potential in many cropping systems. Consequently, commercial products have been developed as biopesticides, biofertilizers and soil amendments. Trichoderma species use several mechanisms to prevent plant diseases including antibiosis, induced resistance niche exclusion and mycoparasitism. Antibiosis is the production of secondary metabolites or peptides with antimicrobial activity. Plants recognize Trichoderma colonization and generate an active defense reaction limiting Trichoderma spread as well as simultaneously induce resistance to plant pathogens. Trichoderma species out-compete plant pathogens for nutrients or physically exclude pathogens. Mycoparasitism is the inhibition of disease development by directly feeding on plant pathogens. Root colonization also enhances plant growth and productivity and helps plants to overcome abiotic stresses such as drought or acidic soil. These biocontrol events are consequences of Trichoderma-plant-pathogen interactions.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/24748
ISSN
0973-6263
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생명공학부 > 생명공학부 > Articles
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