Amblyopia and Strabismus by Monocular Corneal Opacity Following Suspected Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in Infancy

Title
Amblyopia and Strabismus by Monocular Corneal Opacity Following Suspected Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in Infancy
Author(s)
김명미구병영[구병영]손준혁
Keywords
Amblyopia; Corneal opacity; Keratoconjunctivitis; Strabismus
Issue Date
201108
Publisher
대한안과학회
Citation
Korean Journal of Ophthalmology, v.25, no.4, pp.257 - 261
Abstract
Purpose: To identify the long term clinical course of amblyopia and strabismus that developed secondary to a monocular corneal opacity following suspected epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) in infancy. Methods: This was a retrospective study analyzing the medical records of seven patients, treated in our clinic, who were followed for more than five years. Results: Four patients in our clinic underwent a corneal ulcer treatment following suspected EKC. Each developed a monocular corneal opacity. Three patients with a chief complaint of corneal opacity were transferred to our clinic from other clinics. These patients had documented histories of treatment for EKC in infancy. All patients were treated with early occlusion therapy, but amblyopia persisted in four patients. Furthermore, all patients had strabismus and showed a significant reduction of stereoscopic vision. Conclusions: Although infants with EKC are not always cooperative, slit lamp examination should be performed as early as possible, and appropriate medical treatment should be performed, thus reducing the development of corneal opacity. Careful follow up should be regularly performed, and the occurrence of amblyopia or strabismus should be verified at an early stage using visual acuity or ocular alignment examination. Ophthalmologic treatments,including active occlusion therapy, should also be pursued.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/24681
ISSN
1011-8942
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 안과학교실 > Articles
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