Clinical usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in patients with transtentorial herniation following traumatic brain injury

Title
Clinical usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in patients with transtentorial herniation following traumatic brain injury
Author(s)
장성호홍지헌[홍지헌]김성호김오룡안상호조희경[조희경]
Keywords
KERNOHANS NOTCH PHENOMENON; IPSILATERAL MOTOR DEFICIT; CHRONIC SUBDURAL-HEMATOMA; AXONAL INJURY; CORTICOSPINAL TRACT; FIBER TRACTOGRAPHY; LESIONS; TUMOR; CRUS
Issue Date
201109
Publisher
INFORMA HEALTHCARE
Citation
BRAIN INJURY, v.25, no.10, pp.1005 - 1009
Abstract
Primary objective: This study investigated the clinical usefulness of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) for elucidation of the corticospinal tract (CST) state in patients with transtentorial herniation (TH) following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods and procedures: Eleven consecutive patients with TH were recruited among 175 patients with TBI. Patients who showed TH were classified into two groups according to DTT findings: Group 1: the integrity of CST was preserved, Group 2: the integrity of CST was disrupted at the cerebral peduncle (CP) or pons. Outcomes and results: Five patients belonged to Group 1 of TH, six patients to Group 2 of TH. On DTT of Group 1, fractional anisotropy values of the CP and pons along the CST in the affected hemisphere were lower than those of the unaffected hemisphere; however, the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). In Group 2, fractional anisotropy values of the CP and pons in the affected hemisphere were significantly lower than those of the unaffected hemisphere (p < 0.05). Conclusions: It was found that DTT is useful in evaluation of the presence and the severity of CST injury in patients with TH following TBI.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/24644http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2011.605095
ISSN
0269-9052
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 재활의학교실 > Articles
의과대학 > 신경외과학교실 > Articles
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