Association of ozone exposure with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and allergic sensitization

Title
Association of ozone exposure with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and allergic sensitization
Author(s)
사공준김병주[김병주]권지원[권지원]서주희[서주희]김효빈[김효빈]이소연[이소연]박강서[박강서]유진호[유진호]김환철[김환철]임종한[임종한]김수영[김수영]이철갑[이철갑]강동묵[강동묵]하미나[하미나]홍윤철[홍윤철]권호장[권호장]홍수종[홍수종]
Keywords
AIR-POLLUTION; RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS; LUNG-FUNCTION; CHILDREN; CHILDHOOD; SCHOOLCHILDREN; PREVALENCE; INFECTIONS; DISEASES; HEALTH
Issue Date
201109
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC
Citation
ANNALS OF ALLERGY ASTHMA & IMMUNOLOGY, v.107, no.3, pp.214 - 219
Abstract
Background: Children are vulnerable to air pollution, which is known to be related to the recent increasing trend of allergic disease. Objective: To investigate the effects of air pollution on respiratory allergic diseases in school children. Methods: A prospective survey of parental responses to International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaires, together with allergy evaluation, was conducted in 1743 school children selected from metropolitan cities and industrial areas during a 2-year period. Individual exposure to air pollution was estimated by using a geometric information system with the 5-year mean concentration of air pollutants. Results: A total of 1,340 children (male:female ratio, 51.4:48.6) with a mean (SD) age of 6.84 (0.51) years were included in the analysis. Each child underwent allergy evaluation at the time of enrollment and at a 2-year follow-up. After 2 years, the 12-month prevalence of wheezing was significantly decreased, whereas the lifetime prevalence of allergic rhinitis showed a significant increase. Ozone exposure was significantly associated with the 12-month prevalence of wheeze (odds ratio per 5 ppb, 1.372; 95% confidence interval, 1.016-1.852). Ozone was also associated with allergic rhinitis in children who reside in industrial areas. In addition, significant positive associations between ozone and the rate of newly developed sensitization to outdoor allergen were found (P for trend = .007). Conclusion: Exposure to ozone was associated with current wheeze and allergic rhinitis. An increased rate of newly developed sensitization to outdoor allergen by ozone may explain the association. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2011;107:214-219.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/24588http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2011.05.025
ISSN
1081-1206
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 예방의학교실 > Articles
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