Dietary Supplements and Mortality Rate in Older Women The Iowa Women's Health Study

Title
Dietary Supplements and Mortality Rate in Older Women The Iowa Women's Health Study
Author(s)
Jaakko Mursu[Jaakko Mursu]Kim Robien[Kim Robien]Lisa Harnack[Lisa Harnack]박경David R. Jacobs Jr[David R. Jacobs Jr]
Keywords
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE; MULTIVITAMIN USE; CANCER INCIDENCE; FOLIC-ACID; RISK; PREVENTION; QUESTIONNAIRE; METAANALYSIS; VITAMIN
Issue Date
201110
Publisher
AMER MEDICAL ASSOC
Citation
ARCHIVES OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, v.171, no.18, pp.1625 - 1633
Abstract
Background: Although dietary supplements are commonly taken to prevent chronic disease, the long-term health consequences of many compounds are unknown. Methods: We assessed the use of vitamin and mineral supplements in relation to total mortality in 38 772 older women in the Iowa Women's Health Study; mean age was 61.6 years at baseline in 1986. Supplement use was self-reported in 1986, 1997, and 2004. Through December 31, 2008, a total of 15 594 deaths (40.2%) were identified through the State Health Registry of Iowa and the National Death Index. Results: In multivariable adjusted proportional hazards regression models, the use of multivitamins (hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.10; absolute risk increase, 2.4%), vitamin B(6) (1.10; 1.01-1.21; 4.1%), folic acid (1.15; 1.00-1.32; 5.9%), iron (1.10; 1.03-1.17; 3.9%), magnesium (1.08; 1.01-1.15; 3.6%), zinc (1.08; 1.01-1.15; 3.0%), and cop-per (1.45; 1.20-1.75; 18.0%) were associated with increased risk of total mortality when compared with corresponding nonuse. Use of calcium was inversely related (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.94; absolute risk reduction, 3.8%). Findings for iron and calcium were replicated in separate, shorter-term analyses (10-year, 6-year, and 4-year follow-up), each with approximately 15% of the original participants having died, starting in 1986, 1997, and 2004. Conclusions: In older women, several commonly used dietary vitamin and mineral supplements may be associated with increased total mortality risk; this association is strongest with supplemental iron. In contrast to the findings of many studies, calcium is associated with decreased risk.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/YU.REPOSITORY/24452
ISSN
0003-9926
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생활과학대학 > 식품영양학과 > Articles
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